Essays Honour Anton Charles Pegis

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Examples of recently published articles (2013)

'Domestic architecture in the Early Bronze Age of western Anatolia: the row‐houses of Troy I' Mariya Ivanova 'Wild Goat style ceramics at Troy and the impact of Archaic period colonisation on the Troad' Carolyn C. Aslan

and Ernst Pernicka

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'The cathedral complex at Nisibis' Elif Keser‐Kayaalp and Nihat Erdoğan

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Editorial Board of the British Institute at Ankara

November 2013

Style Guide for all Institute Publications

General

Submissions must be written in English. Works written by authors whose first language is not English must be proof read and corrected by a native English speaker prior to submission.

The British rather than the American system of spelling should be used (for example 'colour' rather than 'color' and 'artefact' rather than 'artifact').

The British standard rather than the British Oxford system of spelling should be used (for example 'organise' rather than 'organize').

Abbreviations should be avoided wherever possible, except for 'Dr', 'ed.', 'eds', 'fig.', 'figs', 'pl.', 'pls', 'tr.' (translated by).

Initial capital letters should be avoided except for proper nouns.

Oxford commas should be avoided (thus, 'Greek, Roman and Byzantine' rather than 'Greek, Roman, and Byzantine').

Latin abbreviations should not be italicised (thus, 'cf.', 'et al.', 'ca').

Dates

'AD' to precede, no dots 'BC' to follow, no dots 'bp' to follow, no dots 'bce' to follow, no dots Runs of years: 480‐425 BC; AD 527‐565.

Adjectival use of dates: 'the fifth century', but 'of fifth‐century date'.

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Numbers above ten should be written as numerals (for example '11th century AD'), except at the beginning of a sentence.

Runs of numbers: 48‐49, 148‐49, 1148‐49

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Metric measurements should be used. Abbreviations for distance, volume, etc. as follows:

'm' for metre

'cm' for centimetre

'mm' for millimetre

'km' for kilometre

'ha' for hectare

'l' for litre

There should be no dot after an abbreviation and no space between the number and the unit of measurement (i.e. '10m', '20.5cm').

Cardinal points

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Italics

Use of italics should be kept to a minimum. Italics should be used for emphasising isolated words or phrases.

Italics should be used for non‐English terms not in common use (such as Hofhaus or bothros), but not for familiar terms such as polis or spolia.

Transliteration

Latin forms of common names should normally be used (for example, 'Ephesus' rather than 'Ephesos').

Quotations

For short quotes, use ' within normal text. For quotes within quotes, use ". Paragraph breaks should be inserted for quotes of more than four lines of typescript.

Footnotes

The use of footnotes should be avoided.

References

The Harvard system should be used. Avoid using ‘pp’ or 'ff'.

Citations in text:

Single‐author reference: (Gough 1954: 201‐05, fig. 3, pls 16‐18) Two‐author reference: (Solin, Salomies 1994: 113‐24) Three‐author (or more) reference: (Coulton et al. 1988: 13‐15)

Several citations in text (place in chronological order): (Gough 1954: 201‐05, fig. 3, pls 16‐18; Coulton et al. 1988: 13‐15; Solin, Salomies 1994: 113‐24)

Personal communication reference: (Stephen Mitchell, personal communication May 2013)

Citations for ancient and later historical authors should not be abbreviated. Arabic numbers should be used for book/chapter/line references. Where necessary, the edition used should be specified in the bibliography.

Citation in text: Procopius, Historia arcana 30.8‐11

References to standard corpora may use accepted abbreviations, in which case the full citation should be given in the bibliography.

Citations in text: CIL 8: 12296; SEG 28: 1218; IGR 3: 576, IG 7: 415

Page numbers should not be used for cross‐referencing. Any cross‐referencing in monographs must be by section name/number. Any cross‐referencing in articles must be by section name or indicated merely by ‘above’ or ‘below’.

Bibliography

The bibliography should contain only those works referred to in the text.

Entries should be organised by author surname in English alphabetic order (i.e. C/Ç, I/İ, O/Ö, S/Ş, U/Ü should be integrated).

Book titles in English should use traditional capitalisation rules. For other languages, the conventions normal to each language should be followed.

Article titles in English should include initial capital letters for proper nouns only. For other languages, the conventions normal to each language should be followed.

Include the names of all authors (i.e., do not use ‘et al.’ in the bibliography). Do not use abbreviations for journal titles.

Use Arabic numerals for volume numbers.

Include place of publication and publisher.

Do not include US states, unless there is a serious risk of confusion, in which case use the two‐letter postal code (i.e. 'Cambridge MA').

Use English spellings for place‐names (for example 'Munich' rather than 'München', 'Izmir' rather than 'İzmir').

Examples

Ameling, W. 1988: ‘Drei Studien zu den Gerichtsbezirken der Provinz Asia in republikanischer Zeit’ Epigraphica Anatolica 12: 9‐24

Beck, H.‐G. 1959: Kirche und theologische Literatur im byzantinischen Reich. Munich, C.H. Beck

CIL = Mommsen, T. (ed) 1863‐: Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum. Berlin, Berlin‐Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften

Carter, T. 2005: ‘Chipped stone. Team Poznan’ Çatalhöyük 2005 Archive Report: http://www.catalhoyuk.com/ archive_reports/2005/ar05_31.html

Coulton, J.J., Milner, N.P., Reyes, A.T. 1988: ‘Balboura Survey: Onesimos and Meleager, part 1’ Anatolian Studies 38: 121‐46

Demiroğlu, M., Örgün, Y., Yaltırak, C. 2011: ‘Hydro‐geology and hydrogeochemistry of Günyüzü semi‐arid basin’

Environmental Earth Sciences 64.5: 1433–43. doi:10.1007/s12665‐011‐0967‐2

Dodd, L.S. 2002: The Ancient Past in the Ancient Present: Cultural Identity in Gurgum during the Late Bronze Age‐

Early Iron Age Transition in North Syria. PhD thesis, University of California, Los Angeles Dörner, F.K. 1941: Inschriften und Denkmäler aus Bithynien. Berlin, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Gough, M.R.E. 1972: ‘The Emperor Zeno and some Cilician churches’ Anatolian Studies 22: 199‐212

— 1973: The Origins of Christian Art. London, Thames and Hudson

— 1974: ‘Three forgotten martyrs of Anazarbus in Cilicia’ in J.R. O’Donnel (ed.), Essays in Honour of Anton Charles Pegis. Toronto, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies: 262‐67

Grillo, S.M., Prochaska, W. 2010: ‘A new method for the determination of the provenance of white marbles by chemical analysis of inclusion fluids’ Archaeometry 52.1: 59–82

Honigmann, E. 1936: ‘Un itinéraire arabe à travers le Pont’ Annuaire de l’Institut de Philologie et Histoire orientales et slaves 4: 261‐71

Janin, R. 1975: Les églises et les monastères des grands centres byzantins. Paris, Institut français d’études byzantines

Lloyd, S. 1972: Beycesultan 3. London, British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara Procopius, The Secret History. Trans. G.A. Williamson. Harmonsworth, Penguin Books 1981

Solin, H., Salomies, O. 1994: Repertorium Nominum Gentilium et Cognominum Latinorum. Hildesheim, Olms‐ Weidmann

Figures and tables

General

Figures are printed as black and white illustrations.

Figures should be presented in a continuous sequence (i.e., not divided into ‘figures’ and ‘plates’) with reference made in the text to each illustration.

Tables should be presented as a separate continuous sequence with reference made in the text to each table.

Each figure/table must have a caption which should include the source, and, where applicable, acknowledgement of permission having been granted by the copyright holder to reproduce the image/table.

All figures and tables must be clearly identified by the author’s surname and the figure/table number.

In the two‐column layout of BIAA publications, figures and tables can most conveniently occupy one column width (8.1cm) or the full‐page width (16.7cm). Otherwise figures and tables may be grouped together on a part or whole page.

The maximum print area per page (including caption) is 16.7cm by 24.3cm. Either landscape or portrait orientation may be used for whole‐page illustrations. Photographs

Photographs must be submitted as 8‐bit (i.e. greyscale) image files at 300 dpi at either column (8.1cm) or page (16.7cm) width.

Each illustration must be submitted as a separate file. Avoid frame lines.

Final print quality is dependent on original supply of correct format and resolution.

Line drawings

Line drawings must be submitted as 1‐bit black and white image files (i.e. not greyscale or colour images) at 600dpi or as pdf files at either column (8.1cm) or page (16.7cm) width.

Each illustration must be submitted as a separate file.

Where possible, similar items should be drawn to appear at the same scale (for example, 1/3 life‐size for pots). Avoid frame lines.

Maps and plans must include a north arrow and a scale, and drawings of objects must include a scale. The spelling used in legends and of other identifying text must be consistent with the text of the article. Avoid unnecessary lettering on drawings.

Final print quality is dependent on original supply of correct format and resolution.

Tables

Tables should be presented as individual Word or Excel files.

Editorial Board of the British Institute at Ankara

July 2014

Pegis, Anton C. (Anton Charles) 1905-1978

Most widely held works about Anton C Pegis

  • Apologia pro vita sua by John Henry Newman( Book )
  • Papers by James H Robb( )

 

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Most widely held works by Anton C Pegis

Basic Writings of Saint Thomas Aquinas by Thomas( Book )

5 editions published between 1944 and 1997 in English and held by 2,112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For contents, see Author Catalog

Introduction to Saint Thomas Aquinas by Thomas( Book )

22 editions published between 1948 and 2007 in English and Spanish and held by 1,953 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The wisdom of Catholicism by Anton C Pegis( Book )

33 editions published between 1941 and 1962 in English and held by 1,472 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The spirit and substance of Catholic life, faith and history by the saints, martyrs, mystics and philosophers of the Church."

Saint Thomas and the Greeks by Anton C Pegis( Book )

30 editions published between 1939 and 1980 in English and held by 619 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Summa contra gentiles by Thomas( Book )

27 editions published between 1955 and 1975 in English and Undetermined and held by 563 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Summa Contra Gentiles is not merely the only complete summary of Christian doctrine that St. Thomas has written, but also a creative and even revolutionary work of Christian apologetics composed at the precise moment when Christian thought needed to be intellectually creative in order to master and assimilate the intelligence and wisdom of the Greeks and the Arabs. In the Summa Aquinas works to save and purify the thought of the Greeks and the Arabs in the higher light of Christian Revolution, confident that all that had been rational in the ancient philosophers and their followers would become more rational within Christianity." -- Back cover

St. Thomas and philosophy by Anton C Pegis( Book )

9 editions published between 1964 and 1975 in English and held by 506 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

St. Thomas and the problem of the soul in the thirteenth century by Anton C Pegis( Book )

46 editions published between 1934 and 2000 in English and held by 459 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Middle Ages and philosophy : some reflections on the ambivalence of modern scholasticism by Anton C Pegis( Book )

8 editions published between 1950 and 1963 in English and held by 448 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At the origins of the Thomistic notion of man by Anton C Pegis( Book )

8 editions published in 1963 in English and held by 390 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Essays in honour of Anton Charles Pegis by Deug-su I( Book )

9 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 331 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A Gilson reader : selected writings of Etienne Gilson by Etienne Gilson( Book )

13 editions published between 1957 and 1962 in English and held by 290 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Christian philosophy and intellectual freedom by Anton C Pegis( Book )

7 editions published between 1955 and 1960 in English and Undetermined and held by 266 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Saint Thomas Aquinas and philosophy by Etienne Gilson( Book )

4 editions published in 1961 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Essays in modern scholasticism in honor of John F. McCormick, S.J., 1874-1943( Book )

2 editions published in 1944 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Disputed questions in education( Book )

1 edition published in 1954 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Summa contra gentiles by Thomas( Book )

10 editions published between 1975 and 2016 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Summa Contra Gentiles is not merely the only complete summary of Christian doctrine that St. Thomas has written, but also a creative and even revolutionary work of Christian apologetics composed at the precise moment when Christian thought needed to be intellectually creative in order to master and assimilate the intelligence and wisdom of the Greeks and the Arabs. In the Summa, Aquinas works to save and purify the thought of the Greeks and the Arabs in the higher light of Christian Revelation, confident than all that had been rational in the ancient philosophers and their followers would become more rational within Christianity. This exposition and defense of divine truth has two main parts: the consideration of that truth which faith professes and reason investigates, and the consideration of the truth which faith professes and reason is not competent to investigate. The exposition of truths accessible to natural reason occupies Aquinas in the first three books of the Summa. His method is to bring forward demonstrative and probable arguments, some of which are drawn from the philosophers to convince skeptics. In the fourth book Aquinas appeals to the authority of Sacred Scripture for those divine truths which surpass the capacity of reason

Saint Thomas Aquinas by G. K Chesterton( Book )

2 editions published between 1956 and 1992 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For Chesterton, Thomas Aquinas is a man of mystery, who was born into a Neapolitan family amd chose the life of a mendicant friar. Aquinas was to lead a revolution in Christian thought. Chesterton's portrayal will engage, enlighten and confound

Basic writings of Saint Thomas Aquinas by Thomas( Book )

10 editions published between 1944 and 1999 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A Gilson reader; selected writings by Etienne Gilson( Book )

3 editions published in 1957 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Apologia pro vita sua by John Henry Newman( Book )

1 edition published in 1950 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents John Henry Newman's autobiographical response to a public attack on his personal integrity by novelist Charles Kingsley in 1863, who was critical and suspicious of Newman's abandonment of Anglicanism for the Church of Rome, and includes a defense of Catholicism

 

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Audience Level

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Associated Subjects

Albertus,--Magnus, Saint,Anglican Communion--DoctrinesApologeticsApologetics--Middle AgesBonaventure,--Saint, Cardinal,CardinalsCatholic ChurchCatholic convertsCatholic literatureCatholicsChristianityChristianity--PhilosophyChristian saintsChurch of EnglandClergyControversial literature--Catholic authorsEducationEnglandGilson, Etienne,GodGod (Christianity)God--ProofGreat BritainIncunabulaIntellectual freedomItalyKant, Immanuel,Natural theologyNewman, John Henry,Oxford movementPegis, Anton C.--(Anton Charles),Philosophical anthropologyPhilosophyPhilosophy, AncientPhilosophy, FrenchPhilosophy, MedievalPhilosophy and religionPsychologyScholasticismSoulSumma contra gentiles (Thomas, Aquinas, Saint)TeachingTheologyTheology, DoctrinalTheology, Doctrinal--Catholic authorsTheology--Catholic authorsTheology--Middle AgesThomas,--Aquinas, Saint,United StatesWilliam,--of Ockham,

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